The best Tintin comics

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The best Tintin comics
Source:listas.20minutos.es
The Adventures of Tintin is one of the most influential European comic series of the twentieth century. Created by the Belgian author Georges Remi (Hergé), and characteristic of the graphic and narrative style known as "clear line", it consists of a total of 24 albums, the first of which was published in 1930 and the penultimate in 1976 (the last, Tintin and Arte-Alfa, did not end, although the sketches made by the author were subsequently published). In the series, along with Tintin, a fearless reporter of youthful appearance and age never clarified who travels around the world along with his dog Milú, there are a series of secondary characters who have reached as much or more celebrity than the protagonist: among them, Captain Haddock, Professor Tornasol, detectives Hernández and Fernández and singer Bianca Castafiore. The adventures of these characters are carefully set in real scenarios of the five continents, and in imaginary places created by Hergé, such as Syldavia or San Theodoros. Especially from the fifth album in the series (The Blue Lotus), its author was thoroughly documented about the places visited by his characters. The series knew from its beginnings an unprecedented success. It is estimated that more than 200 million albums have been sold since its inception2 in more than 60 languages, 3 not counting pirated editions. The adventures of Hergé's character are also the object of worship and collecting throughout the world. The phrase of Charles de Gaulle is famous, according to which his only rival at the international level was Tintin. 4 Tintin's fame has not, however, been controversial, since some of the series' first albums have received criticism for allegedly showing a colonialist and racist ideology.

TOP 25:
Tintin in the Land of Soviets (1930)
Tintin in the Land of Soviets (1930)
The argument revolves around the Belgian reporter Tintín and his dog Milú, who travel to Moscow, via Berlin, to make a report on the policies instituted by the communist president Iósif Stalin. However, an agent of the Soviet secret service, the OGPU, tries to stop Tintin from doing so, so he puts traps to get rid of him. Despite this, the young reporter will gradually discover the secrets of the Bolsheviks and how they are stealing food from the Soviet citizens, manipulating the elections and killing their opponents.

TOP 24:
Tintin and the art-alpha (1986)
Tintin and the art-alpha (1986)
After several years of a certain lack of ideas, all the data indicate that this new album of Tintin would have been one of the best: the positivism of the stroke and the enthusiasm it shows, indicate that Hergé had achieved a consistent thread for the story. Tintin and the Art-Alpha ends with a vignette in which the bad guys take Tintin by pointing it in the back with a gun. It might seem obvious that Tintin had been saved, had the story ended. However, various data suggest that it really could not have been this way: the testimony of people close to Hergé, as well as the fact that Hergé consulted a friend if he could make Tintin die on the terrace of his house, point to a unusual ending ...


TOP 23:
Tintin and the shark lake (1972)
Tintin and the shark lake (1972)
In Syldavia, near Lake Flechizoft, there is Professor Tornasol, who has invited Tintin and Captain Haddock to spend a vacation. The plane in which Tintin and Haddock travel suffers an accident in strange circumstances. After being saved by two small syldavos, they finally arrive at the teacher's house, who shows them their latest work: a machine capable of reproducing all objects in three dimensions. The infinite possibilities offered by such discovery arouse dangerous greed, in particular from the evil Rastapopoulos, the eternal enemy of Tintin, ready for everything to appropriate the brilliant invention.

TOP 22:
Tintin in the Congo (1931)
Tintin in the Congo (1931)
Tintin travels to the Congo where he meets the native Africans and the exotic and wild animals of Africa. A series of adventures lead him to the kingdom of Babaoro'm where he becomes the chief of the tribe. By chance, he meets a gang of gangsters affiliated with Al Capone who tries to control the production of diamonds in the Congo. Tintin manages to stop them and leaves for their next destination: America. The album has frequently been the subject of controversy for reflecting a clearly colonialist and racist worldview, apart from the vision of an excessive hunt classified as killing many animals in danger of extinction today. Despite this, Tintin in the Congo is very popular in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

TOP 21:
Tintin in America (1932)
Tintin in America (1932)
The story tells the adventures of Tintin in the United States. Upon arrival in the country he is kidnapped by the gangsters of Al Capone who consider him a dangerous reporter. Shortly after he manages to escape and must face other criminal gangs. In the second part of the story, when he is with the Indians, one of the most controversial scenes of the album appears: American soldiers beat the Indians with bayonets to expel them from their lands after the discovery of an oil well. This scene motivated most publishers to try to transform Hergé.


TOP 20:
Tintin in the country of Black Gold (1950)
Tintin in the country of Black Gold (1950)
Following the trail of strange explosions of gasoline, Tintin, Milú and the policemen Hernández and Fernández arrive at a port in the fictional country of Khemed. The ship is registered by the police and a stash of drugs is discovered in the stateroom of the police and documentation related to the opposition group of Sheikh Bab el-Ehr in that of Tintin, placed there to frame them. Tintin is then taken to prison, accused of espionage and sentenced to death. He is freed from death by the minions of Sheikh Bab el-Ehr, believing that he is an ally of his and is led before his boss in a desert camp. Believing him a spy, the sheikh orders the camp to be taken, taking Tintin as a prisoner but ends up leaving him in the desert.

TOP 19:
The cigars of the pharaoh (1934)
The cigars of the pharaoh (1934)
It is the first part of an adventure that continues in the next album, The Blue Lotus. In the cigars of the pharaoh appear for the first time some prominent characters of the series, such as Hernández and Fernández, Rastapopoulos, Allan Thompson and Oliveira da Figueira. Like the previous three albums (Tintin in the Soviets country, Tintin in America and Tintin in the Congo, it consists mostly of a succession of adventures unrelated to each other. Unlike them, however, for the first time Hergé confers a certain unity to the plot by means of a mysterious element, the cigars that give title to the album.The story brings together several typical elements of pulp literature: the curse to the grave-diggers, a secret society and the mystery that surrounds the boss's identity of a band of opium traffickers.

TOP 18:
The Crab of the Golden Claws (1941)
The Crab of the Golden Claws (1941)
In pursuit of the mystery that surrounds the death of a sailor investigated by Hernández and Fernández, Herbert Dawes, related to what appears to be a can of crab, Tintin climbs into the Karaboudjan freighter, where he is captured by a gang of criminals hiding in the cans of crab the opium with which they traffic. Tintin manages to escape from the cabin in which he has been locked up, and finds the ship's captain, Haddock. Captain Haddock, completely alcoholic, has been the victim of the handling of his second aboard, Allan Thompson, and does not know that his ship carries opium. When he discovers it he gets on the side of Tintin. Tintin and the captain manage to escape from the boat in a boat. The captain under the influence of alcohol makes a bonfire with the oars of the boat. In addition, a seaplane sent by the ship tries to kill them. They manage to take control of the plane but, again due to alcohol, the captain causes them to crash in the Sahara desert. After walking through the desert they are saved by Lieutenant Delcourt (commander of the French Foreign Legion) who provides them with a means of transport to the fictional port of Bagghar in Morocco. The Karaboudjan is believed to be shipwrecked but the captain recognizes him at the port and the smugglers kidnap him. Tintin tries to free him with the help of Hernández and Fernández by discovering the head of the smugglers Omar ben Salaad and arresting the entire band.


TOP 17:
The scepter of Ottokar (1939)
The scepter of Ottokar (1939)
Müstler wants Syldavia to annex Borduria. For this, he wants the king not to wield the scepter of Ottokar IV during the parade on St. Vladimir's Day, as it would mean that he loses the throne. Stealing the scepter, they will steal the monarchy and may annex. Tintin, accompanying a teacher, travels to Syldavia and discovers the plot. Now, he wants to warn the king and avoid annexation.

TOP 16:
The Mysterious Star (1942)
The Mysterious Star (1942)
Tintin observes a star that seems to get closer and closer to Earth. At the observatory, he meets Professor Calys, who tells him that it is a meteorite that will impact the planet in a few hours causing the end of the world. Fortunately, scientists had been wrong in the calculations and the meteorite passes by although a fragment falls into the North Sea. Some analyzes reveal that the meteorite contains an unknown metal with strange properties, which Professor Calys baptizes as calystene. An expedition is organized to recover the fragment that has fallen into the sea. In the expedition, together with a group of prestigious scientists from around the world, Tintin and Captain Haddock participate. However, they must compete with an unscrupulous businessman who has chartered another expedition and will do the impossible to prevent the protagonists from reaching the airfield before their men.

TOP 15:

The Temple of the Sun (1949)

The Temple of the Sun (1949)
Tintin and Captain Haddock travel to Peru in search of Professor Tornasol, whom they find aboard a ship bound for that country called Pachacámac, but they fail to free him. After much research, they realize that Tornasol could be held in an Inca pyramid in the middle of the jungle, the last place of Inca settlement, so they decide to go there. After crossing the Andes and the jungle (in the company of a young man from the place called Zorrino and serving as a guide), they arrive at the site where the pyramid is located. They are taken prisoner and find out that Tornasol was going to be sacrificed along with them, for committing the sacrilege of putting on a pledge of a sacred mummy. Finally, Tintin uses a cunning (an eclipse occurred in that same place) to free them all and return together.


TOP 14:

The broken ear (1937)

The broken ear (1937)
An Arumbaya idol has been stolen from the Ethnographic Museum and Tintin begins his search. Following the clues, he discovers that two men are also interested in the same fetish. These men are heading towards San Teodoro, a republic of South America. Tintin follows them and is at the center of a revolution. By a series of coincidences he ends up becoming a field aid for General Alcazar. The war breaks out between San Teodoro and its neighbor, Nuevo Rico; Tintin, persecuted by all, flees to the territory of the Arumbayas. There he finally discovers the secret of the idol: it contains a small diamond. Finally, the fetish is recovered in Europe and returned to the museum.

TOP 13:

The Black Island (1938)

The Black Island (1938)
On one of their rides, Tintin and Milú see a plane that seems to have problems. When approaching they are attacked and the plane is on the run. After recovering, he learns that the plane has crashed in England. Tintin goes to England in search of his assailants and ends up on the trail of Doctor Müller, who captures him, but Tintin escapes and begins his persecution. During the same, Tintin is in turn persecuted by Hernández and Fernández who believe him guilty of a robbery on a train. Finally, following Müller, Tintin arrives at the Scottish town of Kitloch where he embarks for a nearby island where it is believed that there is a monster (in clear allusion to the Loch Ness monster). The island is nothing but the base of a band of money forgers who use a gorilla to scare away the curious with their amplified roars.

TOP 12:

Tintin and the "Rogue" (1976)

Tintin and the "Rogue" (1976)
The story begins with Tintin arriving at Moulinsart where he is informed by Captain Haddock that Bianca Castafiore has started a tour of San Theodoros (The Broken Ear), the country of the overthrown General Alcazar. The next day Tintin, Haddock and Professor Tornasol learn that Bianca Castafiore, his maid Irma, his pianist Wagner and the detectives Hernández and Fernández have been arrested on charges of conspiracy to defeat General Tapioca (ruler dictator of San Theodoros's turn) , and they three (Tintin, the captain and Tornasol) are accused of planning the operation. Tintin, Haddock and Tornasol travel to San Theodoros to meet General Tapioca who holds them without making them prisoners. During the course of a tourist visit to an Aztec pyramid, organized so that Tintin is "rescued" by General Alcázar, they are victims of a betrayal by Pablo (The Broken Ear) who tries to help the tapioquistas to suppress The four friends Tintin realizes this trick and manages to get everyone out alive after which they go to the Pícaros guerrilla camp commanded by General Alcazar. Once in the Alcazar camp and its guerrillas the Rogue, the few possibilities of success of the coup d'etat that General Alcazar intends to carry out are evident, because his soldiers are permanently drunk (due to the whiskey boxes that they are launched by General Tapioca's planes). Tintin manages to convince General Alcazar to make a revolution without bloodshed and in return he will take care of preventing his men from getting drunk. Using a new invention of Professor Tornasol that produces alcohol intolerance (and that has been proven by Captain Haddock without him knowing it), they achieve that Alcazar's men cannot taste alcohol. When they plan the coup, a lost coach appears full of Belgian artists (the Happy Turlurones) directed by Serafín Brasón to participate in the celebrations of Tapiocapolis. Using the same costumes of the group of artists they manage to enter the capital and take power. It is discovered that the brain behind the lie is Colonel Sponz (The Tornasol affair).

TOP 11:

Objective: the Moon (1953)

Objective: the Moon (1953)
Returning to Moulinsart Castle from his previous adventure, Tintin and Captain Haddock learn that Professor Silvester Tornasol has gone to Syldavia. After meeting him in the Balkan country, they discover that Tornasol is working in a secret atomic research plant in the heart of the Zmylpathes mountain range. The professor has been hired by the syldavo government to direct the construction of an atomic rocket on board which will be the first manned trip to the Moon. From there, the whole adventure takes place in the space station and the surrounding mountains. They attend the construction of the rocket (which looks like a German V2), the first tests and their own training as astronauts (little intense for what will be the training of real astronauts years later). At the same time, they must deal with a mysterious plot, apparently led by neighboring Borduria, which aims to sabotage the project. The ineffable Hernández and Fernández are sent to help with the investigations. Finally, despite the difficulties, the rocket is ready and takes off towards its destination. There the plot is interrupted, which will continue in the following volume: Landing on the Moon.


TOP 10:

Flight 714 for Sydney (1968)

Flight 714 for Sydney (1968)
Tintin, Captain Haddock and Professor Tornasol head to Sydney to participate as special guests in an international astronautics conference. While they are at the Jakarta airport (Indonesia) waiting for their flight to Sydney, they meet Piotr Pst, whom they had met in a previous adventure, collected in the album Coke Stock. Pst now works as a pilot for the eccentric millionaire Laszlo Carreidas. The latter invites the three protagonists to travel with him to Sydney in his private plane. However, Carreidas secretary Spalding and two of the plane's crew members are part of a plot to hijack the plane and divert it to a volcanic island in the Indian Ocean, where a rugged landing takes place. Tintin, Haddock, Tornasol and Pst are arrested; Milú manages to escape, but is shot by the kidnappers and the others take him for dead. Later it is discovered that behind the plane's hijacking is the evil Rastapopoulos, who intends to take the fortune that Carreidas has in a Swiss bank. Allan Thompson is the lieutenant of Rastapopoulos. Tintin, Haddock and Tornasol have fallen into their hands by chance, since Rastapopoulos ignored traveling with Carreidas. Taking advantage of the circumstance, however, Rastapopoulos plans to end their lives to take revenge for the defeats they have inflicted on previous adventures. The protagonists are held in an old Japanese bunker from World War II. Carreidas is taken to another bunker, where Rastapopoulos orders the evil doctor Krollspell (the name is possibly related to that of the Nazi doctor Theodor Morell; Kroll can also refer to the Berlin opera house where the Nazi Reichstag meetings took place) to inject to Carreidas a "serum of truth" of his invention. The product is too successful, since Carreidas begins to confess all the evils he has committed since the age of four, but does not give Rastapopoulos the desired information. Accidentally, the doctor injects the exasperated Rastapopoulos with a dose of his serum. Meanwhile, Tintin, Haddock, Tornasol and Pst manage to escape the bunker in which they had been locked up, with the help of Milú. They go to the place where Carreidas is located. Rastapopoulos, because of the truth serum, trusts Krollspell that he intended to eliminate him as soon as he was no longer useful. Tintin and his friends then break into the bunker and capture Krollspell and Rastapopoulos. However, Rastapopoulos manages to escape when the effect of the serum passes, meets with Allan and undertakes the persecution of Tintin and his friends. Guided by a strange voice in his mind, Tintin discovers, hidden in a strange sculpture that represents the head of an astronaut, a secret entrance that leads into the volcano. Inside the volcano, Tintin and his friends meet a strange character, Mik Ezdanitoff, who reveals that he is in contact with an extraterrestrial culture and has attracted them there by telepathy. Meanwhile, Rastapopoulos and his men discover the entrance, but fail to open it, so they use explosives. Ezdanitoff explains that the explosion will produce the eruption of the volcano, so they should go to the crater, where they can receive help from aliens. They march on there through underground passageways, closely pursued by Rastapopoulos and his men. Tornasol almost dies due to toxic gases, but survives thanks to Tintin. After arriving at the crater, Ezdanitoff hypnotizes the protagonists, who board a flying saucer believing to be boarding an airplane. Soon after, the aliens leave them in the middle of the ocean on a raft. Rastapopoulos and his men, on the other hand, are picked up by aliens, also under hypnosis, and nothing more is known about them. When a plane picks up Tintin and his friends, none of them (except Milú) remember what happened from the moment they embarked on the Carreidas plane. However, Professor Tornasol retains a screw made of an unknown metal. In the last vignette, Tintin, Haddock and Tornasol embark on the flight to Sydney, as planned.

TOP 9:

Coke Stock (1958)

Coke Stock (1958)
After watching a movie, Tintin and Captain Haddock turn a corner and collide with General Alcazar, who drops his wallet. Tintin tries to give it back, but at the hotel they say they don't know anything about that guest, and when Tintin calls a phone number he finds in the wallet, the respondent says he doesn't want to talk to anyone. When Tintin and Haddock return home, they discover that Emir Abdallah's spoiled and unbearable son has been sent to Moulinsart for protection, along with a retinue of servants and guardians who settle in the castle hall. Hernández and Fernández inform Tintin that they know about Alcazar because they are investigating a man named Dawson. They tell him the real hotel where the General is staying. In the Tintin and Haddock hotel they see Alcazar talking to Dawson, Tintin's former enemy during the Blue Lotus affair. Haddock returns Alcázar's wallet, while Tintin follows Dawson and hears him talk about the successful sale of De Havilland Mosquito aircraft for Khemed's coup d'etat. Tintin decides to go to Khemed and rescue the emir; reluctantly as usual, the Captain decides to go with him, besides he does not want to be alone with Abdullah and his jokes in bad taste. Dawson sees how Tintin meddles in his affairs again and decides to eliminate him. At Wadesdah Airport, Tintin and Haddock are rejected at customs, while someone puts a bomb on the plane. The explosion in flight is thwarted due to the fire of an engine, which forces it to land with the device just before the pump explodes. Tintin and Haddock walk through the desert and enter without being seen in Wadesdah. There they find another old friend, the Portuguese merchant Oliveira da Figueira, who helps them escape from the city dressed as a woman. Once outside the walls, a guide with horses leads them to the shelter of the deposed Emir (based in the ancient Jordanian city of Petra). However, their escape is warned and the figures of the new regime send patrols of armored cars and "Mosquitos" to intercept them. Almando is Mull Pasha who is actually Doctor Müller, old enemy of Tintin when the matter of the Black Island and Black Gold. Thanks to the confusing orders, the "Mosquitoes" attack their own tanks instead of Tintin and his friends. The Emir brings them up to date with the slave trade by the Marquis de Gorgonzola. Tintin and Haddock secretly embark towards Mecca to investigate. They are attacked by the Mosquitos again, Tintin manages to take down one with a German StG-44 but the schooner on which they travel suffers numerous damages and finally wreck alongside Piotr Pst, the Estonian pilot of the downed plane. They are picked up by the Gorgonzola yacht, the Scheherazade, and transferred to the SS Ramona, a freighter. This ship turns out to be one of Gorgonzola's ships, used for slave trade. That night they are locked up by Allan, the former first officer of Haddock, when suddenly Ramona's crew escapes the ship due to a fire on board and fear that it will explode. The prisoners force the door and manage to put out the fire, without understanding that the whole bow is loaded with explosives. That's when they release a large number of Africans held in the cellars and who had paid to go to Mecca, but were going to be sold as slaves. Haddock tries to explain the situation (who speak Yoruba). At first they cannot or do not know how to understand it, thinking that Haddock lies to them. After some discussions, they agree not to go to the pilgrimage (Hajj) of which the old people say that there are many who do not return. The Africans agree to help Haddock navigate to the safe harbor of Yiouti, while Tintin and Skut try to fix the radios, which were damaged. Tintin finds a piece of paper with the "coke" message, but fails to understand it. In navigation, "coke" usually refers to coal fuel, but it is not what they charge. Then a dhow approaches and an Arab who wants to inspect the "coke" gets on the boat. As Haddock doesn't understand, they tell him they don't carry. The man begins to inspect the Africans. With the term coke, they were referring to the slave trade, and in understanding this Haddock throws the ship's Arab, and one of the Africans thwarts an attempt by the Arab to stab the Captain. Gorgonzola (who is a Rastapopulos realemte, drug dealer and arch-enemy of Tintin from Pharaoh's Cigars and The Blue Lotus) discovers that Haddock has taken control of the ship, and sends a submarine to sink it. Tintin realizes the submarine by accident just before the attack. Haddock manages to circumvent the first torpedoes with maneuvers, but does not know how much more they will endure. At this crucial moment is when Ramona is saved by US Navy cruiser aircraft, the USS Los Angeles, which had been warned via radio by Tintin. From the submarine makes a

TOP 8:

Landing on the Moon (1954)

Landing on the Moon (1954)
The story continues at the point where the previous album is: after the successful launch of the rocket attempts to contact the crew. However, there is a surprise, the Fernandez have been confused of time and are on board. After a trip not exempt from some shock, they moon on the moon, in the Hipparchus crater, where they set up the equipment and begin the investigations and exploration of the terrain with the odd anecdote. In one of the expeditions in which the Tintin rocket and the engineer Wolff remain, Colonel Jorgen, a conspirator of Borduria, enters into action to seize the rocket and abandon the expeditionaries on the satellite. Tintin manages to thwart the blow but they are forced to return to the ground due to insufficient oxygen reserves for the crew. After a new attempt by the conspirators to seize the rocket (as a result, Jorgen dies by firing his gun while struggling with Wolff, who tried to prevent the colonel from killing the rest of the crew. Later, Wolff himself sacrifices his life by launching into space, so that others have enough air. The rocket is directed to the earth with insufficient oxygen, but in the end everyone comes to Earth safe and sound.

TOP 7:

The jewels of the Castafiore (1963)

The jewels of the Castafiore (1963)
The jewels of the Castafiore constitutes a curious amusement that is unmarked from the usual in the Tintin albums: there are no trips, there are no great events, not even true villains. Castafiore comes to spend a few days at Haddock's house along with his two assistants. Tintin, Milú, Tornasol, Néstor and Hernández and Fernández will also be present at the house.

TOP 6:

The Blue Lotus (1936)

The Blue Lotus (1936)
The Blue Lotus is the second part of a story started in the previous album, The Pharaoh's Cigars, although it can be read independently. The action takes place mainly in China, in the city of Shanghai. The title is taken from the name of a fictional opium smoker in the same city. It has a great relevance in the history of the series, as it was the first time that its creator, Hergé, worried about being thoroughly documented about the subject, for which he had the help of a Chinese student, Zhang Chongren, who would influence notably in the album and in his later work. For some authors, it is Hergé's first masterpiece and there are even those who consider this album the best of the entire series.


TOP 5:

The treasure of Rackham the Red (1944)

The treasure of Rackham the Red (1944)
Tintin and Captain Haddock prepare the trip aboard the Sirius in search of the treasure of Rackham the Red. Before sailing, they meet Professor Silvestre Tornasol, who shows them a submarine that would supposedly help them on their journey. Tornasol's deafness prevents him from understanding, until Haddock writes, that his invention is not well received. The ship sails, with the company of the policemen Hernández and Fernández, since one of the Pájaro brothers (enemies of Tíntin in the first album of this series) has escaped and prowled near the ship before he left the port. Later, a stowaway will be discovered on the ship, Professor Tornasol, who sneaked into the ship next to his invention.

TOP 4:

The Secret of the Unicorn (1943)

The Secret of the Unicorn (1943)
Hernández and Fernández go to the Old Market to investigate a mysterious series of wallet thefts. There they meet Tintin, who acquires the model of a ship on the market to give it to his comrade, Captain Haddock. Shortly after buying the gift, he is approached by two individuals who make offers for the model. The first is one Ivan Ivanovitch Sakharine; the second, whose name is still ignored, turns out to be a Barnaby. Shortly after Tintin receives a visit from Sakharine, who is still trying to buy the ship. Tintin refuses again. Milú accidentally knocks down the ship and breaks the mast, and when Tintin is fixing the damage comes Captain Haddock, who is very surprised to see the ship. He takes Tintin to his house and shows him a painting in which the same ship, called Unicorn, appears after a portrait of an ancestor of Haddock, the knight of Hadoque, who lived in the time of Louis XIV. Tintin returns home, and discovers that the ship has disappeared. He goes to investigate the house of Ivan Ivanovitch Sakharine, and discovers that he has a ship model identical to the one that has been stolen (it is not the same, since the mast is not broken). When he returns home, he finds everything scrambled, a sign that he who stole the ship has returned in search of something else. The next day, when he is putting order in his house, Tintin discovers a strange parchment with a code message. He deduces that he was hidden in the mast of the model of the Unicorn, and goes to the house of Captain Haddock to share his discovery. When he arrives, the door is closed and Haddock does not answer the calls of Tintin, who chooses to knock down the door, and finds his friend, quite drunk, touched with a hat similar to that of his ancestor of the painting, and wielding a saber . Haddock tells him that he has been reading the memoirs of the Hadoque knight, and begins to narrate (and to stage, at the same time, sometimes with serious damage to the furniture), accompanied by several drinks of a whiskey bottle, the confrontation of his ancestor with a famous pirate, Rackham the Red. From history it follows that his ancestor knew the location of this pirate's treasure. In addition, in the memoirs of the knight of Hadoque there is a kind of testament in which he bequeathed to his children three models of his ship, the Unicorn, with the indication that moving the main stick will come to know the whole truth ...

TOP 3:

The 7 Crystal Balls (1948)

The 7 Crystal Balls (1948)
The archaeologists of the Sanders-Hardmuth expedition return to Europe after two years in Peru and Bolivia, where they have found the grave of the Inca king Rascar Capac. They will soon begin to suffer a strange disease that plunges them into a deep lethargy, waking up all at the same time of day, tremendously startled, as if they were tortured to fall back into their sleep. Everything indicates that it is the punishment prophesied in Rascar Capac's own grave. Next to all the patients are the remains of spherical glass balls with some poison inside. Tintin, Captain Haddock and Professor Tornasol visit one of the members of the expedition: Professor Hipólito Bergamotte. When he falls ill and Professor Tornasol is kidnapped, Tintin and the captain follow his friend's lead that will take them to Peru.

TOP 2:

The Tornasol affair (1956)

The Tornasol affair (1956)
The story begins with Tintin and Captain Haddock back to Moulinsart, when they are surprised by a storm, a strange storm that causes the breaking of mirrors and vases throughout the palace. The strange storm turns out to be the tests of an ultrasonic generator developed by Professor Tornasol, which will disappear a few days later at a conference in Switzerland. Tintin and Haddock meet in Geneva to be able to keep track, and just when they are about to free him from his kidnappers, the bordurios, Tornasol is again kidnapped, this time by the syldavos. However Syldavia's spies are not able to retain Tornasol who is again kidnapped by Borduria and transferred to Szohôd. Finally, with the help of Bianca Castafiore, they manage to rescue Tornasol, who decides to destroy the plans of his invention to prevent it from becoming a weapon. In this story, the tension and rivalry between Syldavia and Borduria is reflected again, as a reflection of the situation between the communist and capitalist blocs at that time.

TOP 1:

Tintin in Tibet (1960)

Tintin in Tibet (1960)
It all starts in an imaginary resort in Vargèse (Savoy) next to Captain Haddock, Tintin reads about a plane crash in the Himalayan mountains. That same afternoon at the hotel, Tintin falls asleep a little while playing chess with the Captain, who is having a hard time deciding his next move. Tintin has a very real dream about his Chinese friend Chang Chong-Chen (see The Blue Lotus) waking up in the middle of a burning airplane, and at this moment he wakes violently, shouting "Chang!" and throwing everything on the table. The next morning, he reads in the newspaper that Chang was on the wrecked plane in Tibet. Firmly believing that the dream was a true vision, Tintin travels to Kathmandu, followed by a more than skeptical Captain Haddock. There they hire a sherpa named Tharkey, and accompanied by several porters, they go to the place of impact. After a series of events, he discovers large footprints in the snow and Tharkey says they belong to the Yeti. The porters leave the group, and Tintin, Haddock and Tharkey continue, taking the load they can. Finally they manage to reach the place of the collision, where Tintin finds a teddy bear half buried in the snow, which seems to be belonging to Chang. Tintin goes into the snow trying to follow in the footsteps of Chang, and finds a cave where Chang carved his name on the rock. Then a storm occurs and Tintin falls into a groove in the ground, rejoins Haddock and Tharkey, who had been sheltered in the wrecked plane. Tharkey decides not to continue later, stating that Chang was dead, and Tintin, Milú and Haddock continue when Tintin sees a scarf on the side of a mountain. Haddock loses his grip and swings dangerously over the abyss. He wants Tintin to cut the rope that unites them and can be saved, but Tintin rejects the idea, saying either they are saved or they die together. Tharkey, moved by Tintin's disinterest, returns just in time to save them. They set up a tent on top, but the strong wind takes it, to the face of the yeti. They decide to walk all night, and finally they see the monastery of Khor-Biyong. An avalanche occurs, and all three are buried by snow. Blessed Ray, a monk from the monastery, 'sees' Tintin, Milú, Haddock and Tharkey in the snow, in a vision. Up in the mountains, Tintin regains consciousness, and unable to reach the monastery, writes a note and sends Milú to deliver it. Milú marches to the monastery but entertains and loses his note. Finally Milú gets the monks to follow him. Captain Haddock wakes up in the monastery. There he finds Tintin and Tharkey again. Then Tintin tells the Grand Abbot why they are there, and he recommends that they abandon the search and return to their country. Blessed Ray has another vision, through which Tintin concludes that Chang is still alive, in a cave, but the "migou" (the yeti) retains him. Haddock does not believe in the vision, but the abbot explains that much of what happens in Tibet seems impossible to Westerners. Tintin heads to Charabang, a town in the mountains near where Rayo Bendito said Chang was. Haddock initially refuses to follow Tintin, but ends up going to Charabang, and both, with Milú, climb to the "Horn of the Yak" - the place where the monk saw Chang. They wait until the yeti leaves the cave. Tintin enters with a camera, as the Captain had ordered him to take a picture of the Yeti if he could. Inside the cave, Tintin finally finds Chang, who is trembling and with fevers. Haddock fails to warn Tintin of the return of the Yeti, and he enters the cave, Tintin nervously fires the camera flash. The yeti, frightened by the powerful light, runs out of the cave, ramming the Captain, who was entering the cave. They take Chang on a stretcher, he tells them the story of his survival, and how the Yeti took care of him. Chang calls it yeti "Poor Snowman", and Tintin is amazed that he didn't say "abominable." "Of course not," Chang says, "he took care of me. Without him I would have died of cold and hunger." They meet again with the Grand Abbot and a committee of monks, who give Tintin a silk scarf in honor of the courage shown, and the strength of his friendship with Chang. They are housed again in the monastery, and after a week, when Chang recovers, they return to Nepal on horseback. Chang meditates that the Yeti is not a wild animal, but has a human soul