Spanish inventions that changed the world

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Spanish inventions that changed the world
Source:listas.20minutos.es
These are the inventions that Spain gave to the world of which almost all changed in one way or another the lives of many people throughout the world. A tribute to these geniuses often forgotten and (worse still) unknown

TOP 10:

Disposable syringe

Disposable syringe
Something so simple that he has done so much good ... Manuel Jalón, inventor of the mop, created the disposable hypodermic syringe, something that today seems so normal to us that many times we don't give it the necessary value. Its appearance made a lot for sanitary hygiene and meant a great advance thanks to the use of plastics in the non-proliferation of diseases.

TOP 9:

The Autogyro (precursor of the helicopter)

The Autogyro (precursor of the helicopter)
Juan de la Cierva was a Spanish aviator and scientist, considered one of the great pioneers of aeronautics and aviation. In 1920 he built his first autogyro, the precursor of the current helicopter. Especially important were his research focused on the use of rotors (indispensable for modern helicopters). Ironically, he died in a plane crash when the Douglas plane in which he was traveling from London to Amsterdam crashed during takeoff. He was only 41 years old, and for a long time, his story died with him. Fortunately, since 2001 there is a national research prize that bears his name.


TOP 8:

The mop

The mop
The appearance of the mop of Manuel Jalón, inspired by the mops used in the barracks (although his former collaborator Emilio Bellvis assures that the invention is his actually) caused a general impact back in 1956. In principle it emerged as a liberating object of the woman, eminently feminist and that allowed them to get up from the ground, not having to kneel to clean the house. Today things have changed and it is considered as a symbolic object of machismo, but it really represented a first step for the liberation of women, and its impact was worldwide.

TOP 7:

The TALGO Train

The TALGO Train
The Goicoechea Oriol Light Articulated Train first appeared in the 1940s, and this is considered the first modern train in history. His designs were really attractive and modern, always looking for aerodynamics and style. For many years they were the dominators of the world market, coming to take over the North American market from the mid-60s to the 80s (in fact, a large part of the US trains are still TALGOs today). The engineer Alejandro Goicoechea thanks to the financing of José Luis Oriol, was the inventor of them until his death in the year 84.

TOP 6:

The Digital Calculator

The Digital Calculator
One of our most important inventors, Leonardo Torres Quevedo, was the father of digital calculators (and many other digital devices, almost magical for the time, such as the laser pointer or the Torres-Quevedo typewriter). He performed the calculations autonomously (some of them quite complex). All subsequent scientific calculators descend from the invention of Torres Quevedo, one of the greatest mathematicians and scientists in history. In addition, at the same time he invented the Telekino, the first remote mechanical control system; Another radio control (the first remote control); The typewriter; the laser pointer; a semi-rigid airship model; and the cable car.


TOP 5:

The Astronaut Costume

The Astronaut Costume
A new pioneer vilified and forgotten by our history. Emilio Herrera Linares designed the first space suit in history, but like so many other pioneers in our country, he has only obtained recognition outside our borders. Scientist and aviator (he was a high command of the republican army during the Civil War), he collaborated with Juan de la Cierva and Leonardo Torres Quevedo in his investigations. His space suit was used as a previous design of modern astronaut suits, but his membership of the losing side of the Spanish Civil War and his presidency of the Government of the Spanish Republic in exile, caused his ostracism and persecution in Franco's Spain. He died in Geneva in 1967.

TOP 4:

The futbolin

The futbolin
Alejandro Campos Ramírez, aka Alejandro Finisterre, was a Galician poet, editor and inventor known for creating the great table football. In 1936 he was injured in one of the Madrid bombings during the Spanish Civil War, and during his stay at the hospital, he met many injured children whose greatest penalty was not being able to play football. When he recovered, and based on table tennis, he commissioned the construction of his first table football table. The toy companies could not manufacture the product in series because they had been nationalized by both sides, being dedicated to the manufacture of weapons. At the end of the war, the victory of the national coup d'etat was exiled in France, but before it had patented the product in Barcelona that it lost while crossing the Pyrenees on foot, which subsequently caused the Valencian toy makers to appropriate the invention as their own during many years (even so, and despite not retaining the patent, numerous designs with his name still existed among Spanish carpenters and toy makers). His life was full of adventures. In the last years of his life he moved to Zamora to meet as executor of his friend the poet Leon Felipe. He died in 2007, and his ashes were scattered on the Douro River from the stone bridge of Zamora and in the Atlantic, from Finisterre.

TOP 3:

The Chupa Chups

The Chupa Chups
The visionary businessman Enric Bernat had an idea and defended it to the fullest: a candy with a stick to suck. Today, the Chupa Chups brand is recognized anywhere in the world, and its logo, designed by Dalí, has the strength of Coca Cola (on which it was based). Bernat turned a small family business into a large company, based on hard work and many kilometers with the samples. He was a pioneer in the phenomenon of branding, and in the use of exhibitors in shops at a time when that brand did not understand anyone ...


TOP 2:

The submarine

The submarine
In 1887, the lieutenant of the Navy and Engineer Isaac Peral designed and built the first submarine in history (however, dark interests within the Spanish Navy caused the high estates to discard the invention and say it was a fraud and that a vehicle it could not be worth it at all). This, already had all the basic functionalities that can be observed in modern military submarine (electric motors, navigation system, torpedoes capable of reaching a surface ship, periscope, etc ...), and supposed a scientific and military advance without comparison for the time. Pear tree, vilified and humiliated, became ill with cancer, which was complicated by meningitis that killed him with 44 years, without receiving any type of recognition.

TOP 1:

Radio

Radio
About four or five years ago, a news pleasantly surprised us. A Spaniard, Julio Cervera, had invented the radio 11 years before Marconi (with whom he collaborated later. In fact Marconi never scored as much, but was recognized by not having found a patent prior to his model, until now, when he has restored Cervera such an important honor worldwide). Once again, it was the foreign media that echoed the matter, while in Spain it was commented in passing. Julio Cervera was justly recognized as the father of wireless communication. This Spanish military and scientist, an expert in streetcar design, also (here begins an irony, using a supposedly real fact that seems quite funny to me, that people do not catch) prophesied the Moroccan "invasion" of Perejil Island (here ends an irony, using data supposedly real but that seems quite funny to me, that people don't catch). He died in 1929.