The most famous mythical and fantastic weapons

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The most famous mythical and fantastic weapons
Source:listas.20minutos.es
This is a compilation of some of the mythical weapons of literature and mythology, both western and eastern.

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Vorpal sword
Vorpal sword
the vorpal sword or vorpal blade is an object of the novel Through the Looking Glass and what Alice found there. It appears in the poem Jabberwocky.

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Mistilteinn
Mistilteinn
Mistilteinn, also known as Misteltein or Mystletainn, is a mythical sword made of mistletoe that Hrómundr Gripsson uses in Hrómundar saga Gripssonar, a legendary saga of Iceland. Mistilteinn belonged first to Þráinn, a draugr (undead) former king of Valland, the sorcerer-king. Innráinn had killed 420 men including the Swedish king Semingr with his enchanted sword. Hrómund fights with Þráinn and triumphs, burns his body and stays with Mistilteinn.


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Dainsleif
Dainsleif
Dáinsleif ("legacy of Dáinn") is the sword of King Högni, according to what Snorri Sturluson tells of the battle known as Hjaðningavíg. When Heðinn offers him compensation in gold for having kidnapped his daughter, Högni replies: You have made this offer too late, if you wanted peace: now I have unsheathed Dáinsleif, who made the dwarves, and that should cause the death of a man every Once his bare blade remains, he never fails in his blow; In addition, the wounds it causes never heal. Skáldskaparmál, chapter 50, Prose Edda.

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Uruk-hai sword
Uruk-hai sword
It is a crude weapon, without any refinement, a general characteristic of the weapons and tools manufactured by the orcs, although, as stated in The Hobbit, 1 useful and effective. It was not a weapon to be used right-handed, it was a weapon to be used with the terrible force of the Uruk-hai, who could split a skull or, with its tip, pierce the armor of their enemies. Once "hooked" with this tip they could attract it to finish it off. JRR Tolkien refers to the uruk-hai in the set of his work The Lord of the Rings, especially in The Two Towers, 2 but does not make special mention of this weapon, which is more a Weta Workshop adaptation for the films of the trilogy. Always following this film version, as well as the work done for this by Weta Workshop and the various illustrators hired for it, this weapon appears continuously in the troops formed by uruks. Its forge is made in the Isengard caverns, where it is seen for the first time, from the hands of orc blacksmiths under the orders of saruman. These orcs or goblins never carried this sword, it was too heavy for them. Representations of this sword can be found in the hands of the uruk-hai in sketches and conceptual designs of Alan Lee in The Lord of the Rings Sketchbook, which illustrates Aragorn's fight against a multitude of uruks in Amon Hen. Representations of this sword also appear in sketches made by Christian Rivers and Warren Mahy for The Lord of the Rings: the art of The Fellowship of the Ring.

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Grond (battering ram)
Grond (battering ram)
Tolkien describes Grond as a huge one hundred foot long ram that swung over powerful chains, and topped by an enraged wolf head forged in black steel. It also had a fireproof cover. Tolkien had the forces of evil call this battering ram in honor of Morgoth's weapon.1 The army at the service of Sauron used Grond on March 15, 3019 TE2 in the siege of Minas Tirith against the city gates, during the battle of the Pelennor Fields that was played at the end of the War of the Ring. The novel describes how Grond was dragged by "great beasts" (probably by olfactors, since, although it is not said so expressly, they are mentioned a few lines before); guarded by orcs and driven by mountain trolls. With the help of a spell from the Witch King of Angmar, and the spells used to forge it in Mordor, Grond destroyed the formidable gates of Minas Tirith in only three attacks. On the third knock, the doors flew through the air in the middle of a magical lightning, and fell broken into a thousand pieces.


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Megingjörð
Megingjörð
In Norse mythology, the Megingjǫrð fem. (pl. megingjarðar. In Old Norse "force belt; 1 modern Icelandic megingjörð, pl. megingjarðir) is the belt worn by the god Thor. This word is only documented in the Snorri Edda, in which it is always used in the plural (megingjarðar) and in the Rauðúlfs þáttr, in which, however, it is not one of Tor's attributes but of an image of the crucified Christ, according to the Prose Edda the belt, which gave him twice the force when he was wearing it , is one of the three main possessions of the god, together with the hammer Mjolnir and the Járngreipr fem. pl., 2 the iron gloves of the god. There is an episode of the Snorri Skáldskaparmál in which the god Thor addresses the Geirrøðargarðar without his three attributes, Loki has convinced him to do so by fulfilling in this way the condition that Geirrøðr had imposed on him to release him.On the way to the Geirrøðargarðar, Tor spends the night with gýgr Gríðr and, a the next morning, this, as proof of thanks, lends (the verb used by Snorri is ljá 'lend') to God his own iron gloves, his own belt of strength as well as the cane called Gríðarvǫlr or Gríðr's rod so that I can beat the giant with them.

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Járngreipr
Járngreipr
In Norse mythology, the Járngreipr fem. pl. (in Old Norse "iron clamps"; modern Icelandic: járngreipar fem. pl.) or Járnglófar masc. pl. ("iron gauntlets") are the iron gloves of the god Thor. According to the Snorri Edda, together with the Mjǫllnir hammer and the Megingjǫrð belt, the Járngreipr are one of Thor's most important possessions. According to chapter 20 of the Gylfaginning book, Thor used these gloves to manipulate his powerful hammer. The reason for its existence comes from the legend. When the dwarf who worked in the forge, he received a bite in the eye by a horsefly (presumably it was the god Loki in disguise), and caused the handle to become shorter.

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Morgul dagger
Morgul dagger
Morgul dagger is the name that receives a fictional weapon from the legendary British writer JRR Tolkien. This magically poisoned leaf was commonly carried by the Witch King of Angmar and the rest of the Nazgul, it was also he who stabbed Frodo at the Top of the Winds. This weapon had a brittle blade that was destroyed after use and left splinters in the flesh of the victim, so as to facilitate the spread in his body of a curse that ended up becoming a spectrum similar to them, but weaker and manipulable. During the trip of the Hobbits and Aragorn, Frodo was stabbed by this blade, and a piece of the weapon remained inside the wound, making its way through the flesh. Aragorn's care and the Athelas provided by him were not enough to overcome the infection and elven medicine provided by Elrond in Rivendel was necessary, who extracted the splinter and saved Frodo, after seventeen days of agony. Each anniversary of the wound Frodo got sick and only the trip to Valinor would heal him completely. It is known that his resistance was exceptional, and that if he hurt a strong and healthy man, he would not last more than a few hours before he died. Another victim of the leaves of Morgul was Boromir, the eleventh Seneschal of Gondor. He eventually died, but did not become a Spectrum of the Ring, due to death from the wounds before the effect of the weapon was fulfilled.


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Hrotti
Hrotti
Hrotti was a mythical sword in the legends of Volsung (Fáfnismál, saga Völsunga); It belonged to the treasure of Fáfnir, which Sigurðr appropriated after killing a dragon.

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Grond (mace)
Grond (mace)
Grond is the name JRR Tolkien gave to Morgoth's mace in his novel The Silmarillion. The name "Grond" means only "mace" or "club" .1 Grond means "land" in Afrikaans, which, by Tolkien's South African origin, can also explain this name. Morgoth Bauglír used Grond in his fight against Fingolfin in the First Age of the Sun. Tolkien wrote that Melkor brought Grond down with the impetus of lightning. Fingolfin dodged all these blows, but they opened deep craters in the earth. Finally, Fingolfin stumbled upon one of them, exhausted, moment that Morgoth took advantage of to end his life. Grond receives the nickname "Hammer of the Underground Worlds"; phrase that has been taken literally sometimes, so Grond is sometimes misrepresented as a war hammer instead of a mace. This idea is reinforced in The Lord of the Rings when the hosts of Sauron Maria Sitian Gondor is called "Hell Hammer of the Ancient Days" when he is referred to as the honorary name of the terrible battering ram of Mordor. In the index of objects of the same book he is referred to as "Mace of Morgoth".

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Conan's sword
Conan's sword
Son of a blacksmith from the northern lands of Cimmeria, was born on a battlefield. Very young, he took part in the looting of Venarium, bordering with Aquilonia, and shortly after he joined a band of Aesir.5 In Vanaheim, he met a sorcerer named Shaman who showed him a vision of the future in which he was crowned king of the most powerful of the hybrid kingdoms. He crossed all the nations of the Hiboria Era for several years, interfered in the plans of the Tigh-Amun stigio sorcerer, who was one of his most recurring enemies, and while he was a mercenary in the Inner Sea of Vilayet he was persecuted by the Kharam sorcerer's soldiers -Akkad, but saved by the mercenary hirkania Red Sonja.5 Before killing the sorcerer, he showed him a vision in a mirror in which he was represented as a lion. In the port of Messantia, he was forced to flee from the authorities and embarked on the Argos ship, towards Kush and the Black Kingdoms. The ship was attacked and sunk by the Tigress, pirate ship under the command of the Shemit Bêlit, called «The Queen of the Black Coast». They fell in love, and together they dedicated themselves to looting the ships of the hybrid kingdoms for two years.5 The natives of the Black Islands called him Amra, the Lion, with which he understood the meaning of Kharam-Akkad's prophecy. After the wild murder of Bêlit, he was tempted by the magician Zukala, to choose between preserving the life of Red Sonja or recovering Bêlit. He decided not to sacrifice hirkania. He was a pirate in the Barachanas Islands, captain of the Zingarian buccaneers, mercenary in Styx and the Black Kingdoms, was head of the Aquilonian army and taken prisoner by King Numedides whom he subsequently murdered, proclaiming himself king of Aquilonia.6 There he took Zenobia as wife which he had to rescue after traveling half the world and with whom he had three children: Conn, Taurus and Radegund.5 Afterwards he had several adventures with his son Conn, but after a while Zenobia died and in the face of the danger of the Red Shadows, he abdicated his throne in favor of Prince Conn, venturing westward on his ship The Red Lion, disappearing into the Western Sea.


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Lævateinn
Lævateinn
In Norse mythology, Lævateinn is a powerful weapon that is briefly mentioned in the Fjölsvinnsmál poetic Edda. The nominative Lævateinn does not appear in the reading of the original manuscript, but it is an amendment by Hævateinn made by Sophus Bugge and others. The modified name Lævateinn has been considered etymologically to be a kenning for a sword in ancient Norse, translated as a "twig to damage." Laevateinn or levatine, also called, "Wand to Cause Damage" ("Wounding Wand"), or "Staff of Destruction" (Staff of Destruction); It shows a relationship with Lugh's spear in Celtic mythology, which could cause earthquakes and had fire affiliation. Lugh is a god equivalent to Loki in Norse mythology. It is a mythical sword that passed from Loki's hands to those of Surtr and from this it passed to Freyr. In general, the fire element is attributed to it (Loki and Surt are associated with the fire element) and the duality of being a rod-sword or sword-thrower. An elf named Völundr forged it, the name Völundr refers to a blacksmith; Vili one of Odin's brother creation gods and Loki himself. What underlies why the latter was considered as an entity of chaos, in addition to justifying the brotherhood of blood with Odin. For generations, myths and stories were transmitted that the Norse are in the tree (ash) of the world, which is known as Yggdrasill in the Nordic sagas and scandalic poetry. A dark legend tells how an ambitious Jotun ventured into the center of the ash tree to obtain a legendary branch that was there, the “Branch of Ruin”, known for the peculiarity of sprouting in places without apparent life, in pieces of skeletons extracted from a place of abundant foliage (see mistletoe); he tore it from its base and made its way to the lands of the Dvergars. It was the same jotun who gave the branch the attribute to become Leaveteinn.

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Ame-no-nuboko
Ame-no-nuboko
Ame-no-nuboko or Ama-no-nuboko (天 沼 矛 (in the Kojiki), 天 之 瓊 矛 or 天 瓊戈 (in the Nihonshoki? ”Heavenly halberd of the swamp” (in the Kojiki), ”celestial halberd with jewels "(In Nihonshoki)) is the name of a spear mentioned in Japanese mythology. According to Kojiki, the couple of gods Izanagi and Izanami received the order of the other primordial gods (Kotoamatsukami) to consolidate and shape the Earth, which at that time was a soft and soft mass; and they received the Ame-no-nuboko spear. Then, Izanagi and Izanami arrived at the floating celestial bridge called Ame-no-ukihashi (天 浮橋?) and using the spear they stirred the chaotic mass and when it was lifted from one end, salty water came out which, when it fell, coagulated and gave rise to the first island called Onogoro-shima (淤 能 碁 呂 島?). Subsequently, both gods descended to the island, got to marry and gave rise to Japan already an innumerable amount of gods.

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Aegis

Aegis
In Greek mythology, according to Homer, the aegis is the shield or rodeo of Zeus, carved for him by Hephaestus, trimmed with tassels and bearing the head of Medusa in its center. Originally a symbol of the storm cloud, it is probably derived from αισσο aisso, which means 'fast and violent movement'. Another possible etymology is from the root Αιγ- Aig-, 'ola', as in Αιγαίον (Aegean), 'wavy sea'. When Zeus stirred it, Mount Ida was covered with clouds, producing a kind of gigantic tornado called καταιγίς, thunder fell and men were filled with dread; by paronomasia the name of such storm would have been metaphorized with the Greek word to designate the goat, αιχ. Sometimes Zeus lent it to Athena (with him it appeared in Palladium) and, rarely, to Apollo. In a later story1 it is said that Zeus used the skin of the Amaltea goat, which had nursed him on Crete, as a rodeo when he left to fight the Giants. There is also the legend that portrays the aegis as a monster that breathed fire, like the Chimera, which was killed by Athena, who then took his skin as a breastplate. 2 Others even say that the aegis was the skin of the monstrous giant Palas. Another version tells that the aegis had really been the goat's skin used as a belt to hold the shield. When used in this way, it was usually held on the right shoulder, and partially wrapped the chest as it passed obliquely in front and joined in the back to the shield under the left arm. Thus, by extension, aegis was sometimes used to refer to the shield it held, and at other times to a shell, whose function it partly provided. According to this double meaning, the aegis appears in works of art sometimes with the skin of an animal covering shoulders and arms, and sometimes as a breastplate, with an edge of snakes corresponding to the tassels referenced by Homer, and normally with Medusa's head in the center. It is often represented in statues of Roman emperors, heroes and warriors, and also in cameos and vases. Also, in Norse mythology, the dwarf Fafner wears a helmet called Aegis.

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Gram

Gram
In Scandinavian mythology, Gram was the name of the sword that Sigurd (Siegfried) used to kill the dragon Fafner. It was forged by Völundr, the Magic Blacksmith, and originally belonged to his father, Sigmund, who received it in the Volsung hall after removing it from the trunk where Odin had buried it - no one else could take it out. The sword was destroyed and reinforced at least once. After being reinforced, he split an anvil in half. In the Song of the Nibelungs (Nibelungenlied), Siegfried's sword is called Balmung, sometimes called Palmunc. In the cycle of operas Der Ring des Nibelungen ("The Ring of the Nibelungo") by Richard Wagner, the sword is called Notung (or "Nothung"), that is to say "the necessary one".


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Dart

Dart
Dart (Sting in the original English) is the name of a fictional weapon of the imaginary universe created by the British writer JRR Tolkien, which appears in his novels The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. This is an elven dagger collected by the hobo Bilbo Baggins from a cave of Trolls at the beginning of his trip with the thirteen Dwarves and Gandalf the Gray towards the Lonely Mountain narrated in The hobbit. Dart is an elven dagger but for the size of the little hobbit it fits perfectly to be a short sword. Dart was manufactured in the city of Gondolin during the First Age of the Sun. It was saved from the destruction of that city and the flooding of Beleriand by the servants of Morgoth who considered it spoils of war. Like that of other famous Gondolin-made swords, such as Orcrist or Glamdring, for example, the cold steel of Dart had the property of turning a spectral blue color as the orcs approached, eternal enemies of the Elves. It also had an exceptional edge, capable of crossing the skin of a troll driven by the slight force of a hobbit, while Boromir when trying with his sword did nothing but break it. The name Dart is not inscribed in any part of the weapon, it was assigned by Bilbo himself when he saves his fellow dwarves from the giant spiders of the Black Forest. Therefore, the name is not found in any elven language but in the common language (Oestron), represented in the novel by current English (Sting). An important role that Dart played, in the story told in The Hobbit, was to intimidate Gollum, in the cave, while beating in riddles of riddles with Bilbo to decide his future. Hence the dagger has part of the "fault" that the ring ended up in Bilbo's hands; it could be considered that the participation of Dart in this event, as well as his encounter with Bilbo in the cave of the trolls and the loss of Bilbo in the Cloudy Mountains, are part of the fate that Gandalf had planned in Bilbo and that was working in that precise instant. However, all "coincidences", as they might call it in Middle Earth. During the War of the Ring, Bilbo leaves La Comarca and travels once again, for the last time, carrying Dart. When Frodo arrives at Rivendel, where he is located at Bilbo, he gives Dart and the Mithril of the Dwarf Chainmail. Dart is used by Frodo during his trip to Mordor but rarely, after Amon Hen, when the Fellowship of the Ring dissolves, he takes punitive action, since Frodo had to make his way through the secret and not the melee battle . However, Frodo drops Dardo during his fight with Ella-Laraña, who loses and ends up being a prisoner of this monstrous spirit. Sam Gamyi retrieves Dart and with it confronts Ella-Laraña. The last time it is used is in the rescue of Frodo from the Tower of Cirith Ungol, where the Orcs kept him captive, or perhaps later, during the restoration of the Region. The sword passes from Frodo to Sam when he crosses the sea to Valinor with the Three Wise Men (Círdan, Galadriel and Elrond) and Gandalf. Of the fate of Dart nothing is said in the Count of the Years, if it remains in the Museum of Cavada Grande, or if it is taken across the sea by Sam when he crosses the sea, in the Fourth Age of the Sun.

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Tyrfing

Tyrfing
Tyrfing, also known as Thyrfing, is a sword of Norse mythology that appears in the poem of the poetic Edda called The Awakening of Angantýr, and in the Hervarar saga. In Richard Wagner's opera, King Alberich gives it to Odin. Tyrfing is a damn sword. She is the bearer of misfortune, having to kill some man every time she is drawn. Svafrlami de Gardariki, a king of the Odin lineage, forced some dwarves to forge the sword called Tyrfing (in Spanish: harvester, murderer). The dwarves in revenge cast a curse on her, so that her master should die, none of the wounds she caused could be healed and would be the bearer of three great evils. Svafrlami dies at the hands of berserker Arngrim, who inherits the sword and kidnaps Eyfura by force, who becomes his wife and has twelve children. Ongenþeow, the eldest of them all, and his brothers, die near Uppsala due to a holmgang (duel) between Hjalmar and his blood brother Örvar-Oddr; but Hjalmar, wounded by Tyrfing, only has time to sing his death song. Ongenþeow's daughter, Hervör is delivered as a marriage alliance, ignoring their relationship. When she discovers it, the fury of war possesses her, she arms herself like a skjaldmö and heads towards Munarvoe in Samsø, in search of the damn sword of the dwarves.

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Gríðarvölr

Gríðarvölr
In Norse mythology, the Gríðarvǫlr masc. it is the magic wand that the giant (gýgr) Gríðr, (who was also the mother of the god Viðarr: Hon var móðir Viðars hins þǫgla 'was the mother of Viðarr the taciturn' say Snorri's Skáldskaparmál; the father was Odín) , he lent the god Thor warning him of the evil intentions of the giant (yotun) Geirröd to assassinate him; This Yotun had forgiven Loki's life in exchange for him convincing Tor to go to the Citadel of Geirrod, the Geirrøðargarðar without his three precious attributes: Miólnir, the Járngreipr and the Megingjarðar. On the way to the Geirrøðargarðar, Tor spent the night at Gríðr's house; in exchange for that night, she helped him by advising him the next morning about Geirrod and lending him three of his possessions that supplied the three of Thor and that he did not carry with him: Járngreipr gloves and a belt of strength of his own and the aforementioned rod. These objects helped Thor defeat Yotun Geirrod and his family. Gríðr is mentioned in the poem Þórsirápa by Eilífr Goðrúnarson and also in the Skáldskaparmál of Snorri Sturluson.

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Andúril

Andúril
It had been predicted that Narsil would not forge it again until the Single Ring did not reappear, which the Sages wished would never happen. But thousands of years later, Faramir and Boromir had a dream in which they were told that, together with the reappearance of the "Damage of Isildur," the sword that was broken would be forged again and "the uncrowned would be king again." The answer to the puzzle was found by Boromir in Rivendel. There the sword was forged again, at the end of the Third Age, for Aragorn, then receiving a new name: Andúril, Sindarin word that can be translated as "West Flame". Aragorn carried the sword with him during the War of the Ring, wielding the one that had been broken during the war against Sauron, and that, now that the Ring had returned, he returned in turn to defeat the Darkness again. None of Tolkien's texts indicate, however, whether King Elessar's son, Eldarion, received the sword in inheritance after Aragorn's death, or if he received the Glamdring elven sword, which Gandalf had left in Aragorn's custody when he left to the Imperishable Lands.

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Sword of Attila

Sword of Attila
The Sword of Attila was a legendary weapon carried by Attila the Hun. The Roman historian Jordanes, citing the historian Priscus, gave the origin of the weapon: "When a shepherd saw a certain cow of his flock that was limping and could not find reason for that wound, he anxiously followed the blood trail and finally reached a sword that had stepped unconsciously while nibbling on the grass. He nailed it to the ground and gave it to Attila. He was glad of this gift and, being ambitious, thought that he had been appointed governor of the whole world and that through the sword Mars was assured of supremacy in all wars. "1 The use of" Mars "here is due to the interpretation of the Roman Prisco, however, as the Huns did not adopt the names of Roman deities, the name most likely used by the Huns would have been the most generic "sword of the god of war", Hungarian legends refer to it simply as "az Isten kardja" (the sword of God). Prisco's description is also remarkable to describe how Attila used it as a military weapon and as a symbol of divine favor, which may have contributed to her reputation as "the scourge of God." As historian Edward Gibbon has elaborated, "The vigor with which Attila wielded the sword of Mars, convinced the world that it had been reserved only for his invincible arm." [2] In this way it became something like a scepter and, in representation of Attila's right to sovereignty.


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Narsil

Narsil
Narsil (in Quenya Luna-Sol) is the name of a fictional sword that appears in the works of the British writer JRR Tolkien, mainly in the novel "The Lord of the Rings". According to tradition, it was forged by the dwarf blacksmith Telchar in Nogrod, one of the dwarf cities of the Blue Mountains of Middle-earth, during the First Age. At the end of the Second Age, Narsil was wielded by Elendil the High, king of Arnor and Gondor after the fall of Númenor, in the War of the Last Alliance against the armies of Sauron. In the final battle at the foot of the Mount of Destiny, after the death of Gil-Galad (last Supreme King of the Noldor) at the hands of Sauron, Elendil attacked enraged Sauron, although he would end up dead, and the sword, split under the weight of your body when falling. Isildur, son of Elendil, knocked down Sauron and cut off the finger on which he wore the Unique Ring with the blade of the hilt. The fragments of Narsil were taken to the North, along with the Ring, by Isildur, although he fell into an ambush of the orcs in what was called the Gladios Field Disaster. The Ring was lost in the Anduin River, but the fragments of Narsil were taken to Rivendel by Ohtar, Isildur's squire and one of only three survivors of the ambush. The fragments of Narsil were since then inherited from the kingdom of Arnor, until the end of the kingdom, after which the Captains of the Dúnedain, descendants of the kings of Arnor, preserved the fragments in Rivendel.

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Gungnir

Gungnir
Gungnir or Gungner was Odin's spear. The word means the production of a violent tremor or shake, supposedly, it shook vividly to anyone who was beaten by it. According to mythology it was manufactured by the sons of Ivald (the dwarves), and was given to Odin by Loki in compensation for the theft of Sif's hair. Odin throws himself on the battlefield with a gold helmet, a shining armor and his Gungnir spear. This spear could never fail or lose signal, and the oath was rendered on the tip of Gungnir. There is also a character, Durandarte, in the Romancero Viejo, famous for his relationship with Belerma, who personifies the aforementioned sword. Durandarte accompanied Roldán until his death in the battle of Roncesvalles on August 15, 788. In the two songs (La Chanson de Roland and El cantar de Roncesvalles) it is mentioned that Charlemagne finds him with the sword next to him. Carucedo Lake at the bottom of which, says legend, is the Roldán sword. In other versions Roldan threw the sword into the water before he died to prevent it from falling into enemy hands. In El Bierzo there is a legend that the Roldán sword is located in Lake Carucedo, near the Roman mines of Las Médulas1 2 There is another version that says that the Leon knight Bernardo del Carpio after defeating Roldán took the Durandarte sword with which was later buried in Peña Longa (Aguilar de Campoo). Later Carlos I disembarked in Laredo, and when passing through Aguilar he stopped at the tomb of Bernardo del Carpio, and took the sword that would accompany him for much of his life. [Citation needed] This sword had the power to turn into stone , everything that touched it by the north leaf.

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Glamdring

Glamdring
It was forged by the elves for King Turgon de Gondolin, one of the High Kings of the Noldor. It was the twin sword of Orcrist, the weapon of Ecthelion de la Fuente, Captain of the city. The sword disappeared after the fall of Gondolin, at the end of the First Age of the Sun of Arda, being discovered in the Third Age by Gandalf, Bilbo Bolsón and the company of the dwarves (as told in The hobbit) in a cave of trolls , as part of a treasure whose origin could be in the looting of Gondolin. Next to it appeared a short sword (relative to hobbit size; the elves would consider it a dagger) also elven, which Gandalf granted to Bilbo, who, in the course of the adventure named her as Stinger or Dart. Glamdring had the power to shine in the proximity of orcs, like all elven-bladed swords. Gandalf wielded it during the entire War of the Ring. At the end of this, he chose to leave her in the care of Aragorn, King Elessar, as part of his inheritance, before leaving for the Imperishable Lands of Valinor.

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Lightsaber

Lightsaber
The lightsaber, lightsaber or lightsaber (the third meaning is the literal translation of the English lightsaber) is a fictitious weapon that appears in the fictional world of Star Wars. It is similar to a traditional sword except for the fact that its "blade" is a beam of energy (plasma). The characteristic sound is a combination of the lighting of a movie projector and the interference caused by an audio cable without insulation on a television. It seems that the idea of the sword of light is not from the film's director, George Lucas, but from his friend Francis Ford Coppola, who was inspired by the fire sword of Emperor Ming, enemy of Flash Gordon.

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Kusanagi

Kusanagi
Kusanagi-no-tsurugi is a legendary Japanese sword. Her real name is Ame no Murakumo no Tsurugi, ("Cluster of the rain of cluster clouds") but it is better known as Kusanagi ("grass cutter", or more likely "sword of (the) snake"). It can also be called Tsumugari no Tachi. The royal Kusanagi is probably a bronze-style sword: short, right and double-edged; very different from the most recent katana, with a single curved edge. It can be held with one or both hands.


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Holy Lance

Holy Lance
According to legend, the Holy spear (also known as the Spear of Destiny, Longin's spear or spear of Christ) is the name given to the spear with which a Roman soldier, named Longinus according to an apocryphal biblical text, went through the body of Jesus when he was on the cross.

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Mjolnir

Mjolnir
In Norse mythology, Mjolnir (Icelandic Mjölnir, Danish and Norwegian Mjølner, Swedish Mjölner) is the hammer of the god Thor. According to the latest Icelandic sources, Mjolnir is described as one of the most feared weapons in Norse mythology. They relate that it is used to defeat all those who challenge the supremacy of the Æsir. Although it is generally depicted and described as a hammer, it is sometimes referred to as an ax or a stick.1 One of the most popular myths about its origin is recounted in Skáldskaparmál, where it is mentioned that the dwarves Sindri and Brok forged it and presented it Thor as part of a bet made by Loki.

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Excalibur

Excalibur
Excalibur is the most accepted name of the legendary sword of King Arthur, to which different extraordinary properties have been attributed throughout the numerous versions of the myth and subsequent stories. There are several stories of how Arthur becomes the holder of the mythical sword. Geoffrey de Monmouth only says that it was "forged in Avalon," without giving further details. The first version about obtaining Excalibur is the one that Geoffrey de Monmouth tells in Regium Britanniae History: When King Uther Pendragon died, Merlin forged on the island of Avalon (the fairy island) a sword (Excalibur) and stuck it in a stone that was next to a London chapel. In The Cycle of the Vulgate, it is said that Arthur had broken his sword (that of the stone) during a fight against Sir Pellinore. Merlin took him to a lake from which a beautiful young woman, the Lady of the Lake, emerged. This Lady of the Lake was a powerful witch who could walk on the water and had a castle at the bottom of that lake. The Lady had in her possession Excalibur, a magic sword. Merlin asked for that sword for his pupil, and she handed it to him. The sword was stored in a sheath that caused the King not to lose blood when he took it to battles. Merlin warned Arturo to be careful, because one day a woman worthy of his trust would arrive and snatch the Excalibur pod forever. The most widespread legend tells us that Arturo obtained it after removing it from a rock where it was embedded, by an act of magic performed by Merlin to whom his forge would be attributed and this is the French version of R. Moron, in his work called "Merlin." But according to Sir Thomas Malory, an English writer, he states that the Rock's sword was not Excalibur, since Arthur breaks his first sword in a battle against King Pellinore. Being in "The Cycle of the Vulgate", which tells that a nymph of the lake called "Lady of the Lake" gives the true "Excalibur", then representing the second sword of Arthur. The Welsh legend Excalibur is called; "Caledfwlch" thus appears the romance of Arthur's warrior, where Llenlleawg, an Irish knight is the one who steals the famous magic cauldron and kills King Diwnarch.1 The name "Excalibur" means "Cut the Steel", which was one of his so many magical properties, as it was also said that the Excalibur sheath possessed the ability to protect over the carrier preventing it from being damaged or injured. In the modern novel "The Last Legion," Ambrosino, whose real name is Merlin, says that the sword was forged by a blacksmith from a meteorite that fell on the Grampian mountains, (Ambrosino said the meteorite "cooled in the ice of northern Britain, where he was picked up by a blacksmith master who shaped him for three days and three nights, without eating or drinking, to end up forging the most powerful sword on Earth: Excalibur ")